RAID Hardware on Sun’s Microsystems Sparc base machine

This article is base on Sun Documentation, i just put it on my blog in case someone might needed it or perhaps i will be needing it. For detail article you could visit this link

To Create a Hardware Mirrored Volume of the Default Boot Device

Due to the volume initialization that occurs on the disk controller
when a new volume is created, the volume must be configured and
labeled using the format(1M) utility prior to use with the Solaris
Operating System (see To Configure and Label a Hardware RAID Volume
for Use in the Solaris Operating System). Because of this limitation,
raidctl(1M) blocks the creation of a hardware RAID volume if any of
the member disks currently have a file system mounted.

This section describes the procedure required to create a hardware
RAID volume containing the default boot device. Since the boot device
always has a mounted file system when booted, an alternate boot medium
must be employed, and the volume created in that environment. One
alternate medium is a network installation image in single-user mode
(refer to the Solaris 10 Installation Guide for information about
configuring and using network-based installations).

1. Determine which disk is the default boot device

From the OpenBoot ok prompt, type the printenv command, and if
necessary the devalias command, to identify the default boot device.
For example:

ok printenv boot-device

boot-device =         disk

ok devalias disk

disk                  /pci@780/pci@0/pci@9/scsi@0/

disk@0,0

2. Type the boot net -s command

ok boot net -s

3. Once the system has booted, use the raidctl(1M) utility to create a
hardware mirrored volume, using the default boot device as the primary
disk.

See To Create a Hardware Mirrored Volume. For example:

# raidctl -c c0t0d0 c0t1d0

Creating RAID volume c0t0d0 will destroy all data on member disks, proceed

(yes/no)? yes

Volume  c0t0d0  created

#

4. Install the volume with the Solaris Operating System using any
supported method.

The hardware RAID volume c0t0d0 appears as a disk to the Solaris
installation program.

Note – The logical device names might appear differently on your
system, depending on the number and type of add-on disk controllers
installed.

procedure icon  To Create a Hardware Striped Volume

1. Verify which hard drive corresponds with which logical device name
and physical device name.

See Disk Slot Numbers, Logical Device Names, and Physical Device Names.

To verify the current RAID configuration, type:

# raidctl

No RAID volumes found.

The preceding example indicates that no RAID volume exists.

Note – The logical device names might appear differently on your
system, depending on the number and type of add-on disk controllers
installed.

2. Type the following command:

# raidctl -c -r 0 disk1 disk2 …

The creation of the RAID volume is interactive, by default. For example:

# raidctl -c -r 0 c0t1d0 c0t2d0 c0t3d0

Creating RAID volume c0t1d0 will destroy all data on member disks, proceed

(yes/no)? yes

Volume ‘c0t1d0’ created

#

Note:  instead of using boot option via network, you could also use a Solaris Sparc CD/DVD and boot onto single user.
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